Monday, 1 February 2010

The American View.

The following is a quoted from the website an American Specialty Beer Importer (http://www.merchantduvin.com)

"Beers brewed in England come from a deep, historical and rich beer scene, and for centuries English pubs have been the face of English beer.

English Pub Culture: Possibly, part of the warmth and friendliness of an English pub comes from the small homes and dense populations of English cities - people historically did not have big living rooms in their homes, so they needed a place to gather. The cool, damp climate may have also contributed to the cozy environment. What seems clear is that part of the English character is to offer a true "third place" - not home, not work, but a meeting place for conversation, food, laughs, relaxation and great beer. An English pub is a place to feel at home: the furniture and lighting will be comfortable. The food will be hearty, and while it may be great it will never be intimidating. Games tend to be slower-paced and not too loud - like darts. But the key components to the calming magic of an English pub are the staff, and the beer.

For every guest who walks through the door, the publican strikes the right note. Guests who are looking to have a quiet conversation will be able to hold one. Other guests who want sports news, or local color, or even jokes, will find those as well. In a manner that is time-honored, the staff of an English pub will meet the wishes of their guests in ways that may be quite subtle.

And the beer: whether a pub has many varieties of beer or only a handful they will offer a range of flavors. They will have some dark ales, and they will have at least one lager. They will offer a stronger brew, as well as session beers. They will have a pale ale. They might even offer more than one serving temperature, some beers served cold while others are served cool - "cellar temperature." An English pub will almost always offer a cider."

It got me thinking how does your local compare to an outside view of a typical British Pub? (Please leave your comments)

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